Diary of a Red Gum – January 2015

The river red gum growing in the street in front of our house is having a good year! This very tall and healthy eucalypt (species Eucalyptus camaldulensis) flowered profusely in November and December, scattering bud caps everywhere. It was covered with dense clusters of cream flowers and humming with bees collecting pollen. Now in January it is developing its fruit crop for next summer, while putting on new leaves, shedding old leaves and shedding masses of bark. This is the most bark our tree has ever shed, with long sheets cascading onto our garden and the footpath every time it is windy.

dense clusters of river red gum flowers in the summer flowering season

dense clusters of river red gum flowers in the summer flowering season


From my observations in the field, I know that the summer months are the busiest in the growth cycle for most river red gums, except in some cooler regions. The cycle typically lasts for two years, with buds developing in late summer and flowering 10-12 months later, and then fruit developing for another 10-12 months to produce mass seed fall when the seed is released from the trees.
discarded bud caps from river red gum flowers cover the ground under the tree during flowering season

discarded bud caps from river red gum flowers cover the ground under the tree during flowering season


So next summer, there should be mass seeds falling from our river red gum. I will keep a monitoring diary to check.

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About redgumgirl

Dr Anne Jensen is an environmental consultant with a passionate interest in sustainable management of our natural resources, particularly the River Murray and wetland environments. She is particularly interested in using photographs and stories to explain issues around water and protecting natural ecosystems in terms that are understood by the wider community, so that we can manage our environment sustainably for our common future.
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